How long after you stop working are you eligible for disability benefits. I had thought the cutoff was 5 years.?

  • by ThinkTank
  • Jun 14,2019
  • 6 answers

How long after you stop working are you eligible for disability benefits. I had thought the cutoff was 5 years.?


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Insurance Answers (6)

28AKO 3 weeks ago

best thing to do is go on social security website or down to your local security office and ask these questions

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Judith last month

If you worked steadily, without breaks in employment, and had done so for at least 5 years, USUALLY a person continues to be insured for social security disability benefits 5 years after they last worked. It's called date last insured. It means that in order to receive a disability benefit a person must have become disabled before date last insured.
Once entitled to benefits, benefits can be paid until the end of your life IF you haven't medically improved to the point you can work or you haven't worked and become gainfully employed - even if still disabled.
People who become disabled after date last insured might become eligible for SSI (supplemental security income) disability if their income/resources are under certain limits. SSI is a federal welfare program.

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Jenny last month

If it is a legitimate disability, it can last for life.

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A Hunch last month

For federal US disability programs:
SSDI - Social Security Disability Insurance = you need to work for 5 out of the last 10 years to qualify
- If you stopped working 4y 11m ago but worked for 5 years before that, you could qualify.
SSI - Supplemental Security Income (welfare) = this is financial need based and is not based off work experience.

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Casey Y last month

Are you having an issue? Assume you are referring to federal benefits...but you could have another DI policy.

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mbrcatz last month

It actually depends on how old you are, and how much you've paid in, in taxes. It can be as little as 18 months (if you're 23) or up to 10 years (if you're 62.)

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